Methods of Teaching

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAHow do we learn?

We learn by hearing – As far back as I remember, my dad read to us. He read with vibrancy and expression. I loved the stories and poems, often asking again and again for favorites.

We learn by seeing – Do your children see you reading? What value do we place on literature?

Most importantly, we learn by doing.

How do we teach?

Everyone grasps a concept in their own way, but some methods of teaching are universal. I found the website, Adventures in Literacy Land, which may help you, too. http://www.adventuresinliteracyland.com/p/about-us.html It’s a bright colorful site with pictures and graphs that invite learning. My first download from them discussed phonics and breaking down words.

You can find multitudes of teaching techniques, too varied to list here, but one I’m fond of is entitled SQ3R. This method was introduced by Francis Pleasant Robinson in 1946 and is used most often when beginning a new chapter. The initials stand for the words Survey – Question – Read – Recite – Review.

First, Survey the whole chapter by leafing through the pages. Go back over Questioning what you can learn from this chapter. You might even make note of questions that come to mind as you’re surveying. Read the chapter. Probably not all at once. Near test time, go back over the chapter and Recite what you picked up from each subsection. Before the test Review the chapter page by page. I’ve found this system a wonderful habit to develop.

The needs of the student must also be recognized. Has the energetic child been in a classroom all day and now you’re asking him/her to sit while going over the spelling words? Take it outside and shoot hoops or jump on the trampoline while practicing those words. Get creative.

Patience is of utmost importance. Give your student time to think.

What methods do you use? Sharing helps us all.

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One Response to Methods of Teaching

  1. sandycarl says:

    I totally agree that without adult models, children flounder in their learning. Nice post. Thanks for sharing great words of wisdom and advice.

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